Catalog Home Page

Home range and microhabitat selection by Tiliqua rugosa and Egernia napoleonis in the native jarrah forest and rehabilitated mined areas in jarrah forest of Western Australia

Mercier, Angela (2006) Home range and microhabitat selection by Tiliqua rugosa and Egernia napoleonis in the native jarrah forest and rehabilitated mined areas in jarrah forest of Western Australia. Honours thesis, Murdoch University.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Other
Download (72kB) | Preview

Abstract

The present study examined the home range and microhabitat selection by Tiliqua rugosa and Egernia napoleonis in the jarrah forest of southwest Western Australia. The aim of the study was to compare the microhabitats used by T. rugosa with the microhabitats used by E. napoleonis and discuss why T. rugosa was located in rehabilitated bauxite mined areas, whereas E. napoleonis was not. The overall objective of the present study was to identify methods which may be incorporated into the management of rehabilitated bauxite mined areas operated by Alcoa World Alumina Australia, to accelerate the return of T. rugosa and E. napoleonis.

A total of five Tiliqua rugosa and eight Egernia napoleonis were radio tracked from October 2005 until January 2006. The 100% home range average of T. rugosa was significantly larger than that of E. napoleonis. There was no significant difference in 50% Core home range average between the two species. The home range of T. rugosa was made up of native jarrah forest and rehabilitated mined areas. E. napoleonis were only found in native jarrah forest.

The microhabitats significantly selected by Tiliqua rugosa in the native jarrah forest and rehabilitated mined areas were shrubs and leaf litter. In the native jarrah forest spikey and dome-shaped shrubs were significantly selected, but when in the rehabilitated mined areas spikey shrubs were significantly selected, which was probably due to the scarcity of dome-shaped shrubs in the rehabilitated areas. The selected microhabitats of Egernia napoleonis were logs and trees.

The Eucalyptus marginata logs selected by Egernia napoleonis had a mean diameter of 42 ± 2lcm, whilst the Corymbia calophylla logs had a mean diameter of 48 ± 6cm. E. napoleonis did not differentiate between tree species of log. Common characteristics of logs selected by E. napoleonis were the presence of cracks, hollows, and some degree of fire damage. In the present study no logs were located in rehabilitated mined areas.

The trees selected by Egernia napoleonis were significantly larger than a random selection of those found in native jarrah forest or those found in rehabilitated mined areas. Eucalyptus marginata selected by E. napoleonis had an average diameter at breast height of 73 ± 16cm whilst Corymbia calophylla had an average diameter at breast height of 58± 15cm. Species of tree were not differentiated by E. napoleonis.

Both microhabitat structures (logs and large trees) selected by Egernia napoleonis were unable to be located in rehabilitated mined areas. The spikey shrubs and leaf litter microhabitats selected by Tiliqua rugosa were present in native jarrah forest and rehabilitated mined areas. The present study has shown that a lack of suitable microhabitats was reducing the occurrence of E. napoleonis in rehabilitated mined areas. Methods to help rectify this problem are discussed.

Publication Type: Thesis (Honours)
Notes: A digital copy of this thesis is not available. Your library can request a copy from Murdoch University Library via Document Delivery. A fee applies to this service.
Supervisor: Hardy, Giles, Hobbs, Richard, Craig, Michael and Fleming, Trish
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/32754
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year