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Analysis and identification of possible causal agents of canker formation in Eucalyptus phylacis (Meelup mallee) from Cape Naturaliste in the south west of Western Australia

Scott, Peter (2003) Analysis and identification of possible causal agents of canker formation in Eucalyptus phylacis (Meelup mallee) from Cape Naturaliste in the south west of Western Australia. Honours thesis, Murdoch University.

Abstract

This study was carried out on the Meelup mallee, Eucalyptus phylacis, which is a Rare plant, Priority 2, growing in the Cape Naturaliste region of Western Australia. E. phylacis is a clonal plant with a ramet population of 27. The species is believed to be the oldest known Eucalyptus spp. mallee with the most extensive distribution from lignotuber expansion. The population has been subjected to considerable human interference in the last 120 years and is showing evidence of decline. A detailed survey was carried out on the population in order to establish the current condition of the population, and the severity of canker and related damage. Several fungal pathogens were isolated from the cankers, including Botryosphaeria australis and Cytospora eucalypticola. In addition Phytophthora cinnamomi was identified from soil samples with the ramet distribution. Different strains of B. australis were identified using barrage formation between different Vegetative Compatibility Groups. The pathogenicity of known pathogenic and commonly isolated fungi was assessed in E. phylacis and related species including E. decipiens, Corymbia calophylla and C. ficifolia. The data indicated the importance of B. australis in the canker syndrome and highlights future research needs and conservation requirements.

Publication Type: Thesis (Honours)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Notes: A digital copy of this thesis is not available. Your library can request a copy from Murdoch University Library via Document Delivery. A fee applies to this service.
Supervisor: Hardy, Giles, Robinson, R. and Burgess, Treena
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/32629
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