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The rare and undiagnosed diseases diagnostic service – Application of massively parallel sequencing in a state-wide clinical service

Baynam, G., Pachter, N., McKenzie, F., Townshend, S., Slee, J., Kiraly-Borri, C., Vasudevan, A., Hawkins, A., Broley, S., Schofield, L., Verhoef, H., Walker, C.E., Molster, C., Blackwell, J.M., Jamieson, S., Tang, D., Lassmann, T., Mina, K., Beilby, J., Davis, M., Laing, N., Murphy, L., Weeramanthri, T., Dawkins, H. and Goldblatt, J. (2016) The rare and undiagnosed diseases diagnostic service – Application of massively parallel sequencing in a state-wide clinical service. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, 11 (1).

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Abstract

Background
The Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases Diagnostic Service (RUDDS) refers to a genomic diagnostic platform operating within the Western Australian Government clinical services delivered through Genetic Services of Western Australia (GSWA). GSWA has provided a state-wide service for clinical genetic care for 28 years and it serves a population of 2.5 million people across a geographical area of 2.5milion Km2. Within this context, GSWA has established a clinically integrated genomic diagnostic platform in partnership with other public health system managers and service providers, including but not limited to the Office of Population Health Genomics, Diagnostic Genomics (PathWest Laboratories) and with executive level support from the Department of Health. Herein we describe report presents the components of this service that are most relevant to the heterogeneity of paediatric clinical genetic care.

Results
Briefly the platform : i) offers multiple options including non-genetic testing; monogenic and genomic (targeted in silico filtered and whole exome) analysis; and matchmaking; ii) is delivered in a patient-centric manner that is resonant with the patient journey, it has multiple points for entry, exit and re-entry to allow people access to information they can use, when they want to receive it; iii) is synchronous with precision phenotyping methods; iv) captures new knowledge, including multiple expert review; v) is integrated with current translational genomic research activities and best practice; and vi) is designed for flexibility for interactive generation of, and integration with, clinical research for diagnostics, community engagement, policy and models of care.

Conclusion
The RUDDS has been established as part of routine clinical genetic services and is thus sustainable, equitably managed and seeks to translate new knowledge into efficient diagnostics and improved health for the whole community.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases
Publisher: BioMed Central
Copyright: © 2016 The Author(s).
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/32003
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