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Bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration in bronchial segments: the effects of stress vs. strain

Ansell, T.K., McFawn, P.K., Mitchell, H.W. and Noble, P.B. (2013) Bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration in bronchial segments: the effects of stress vs. strain. Journal of Applied Physiology, 115 (4). pp. 505-513.

Free to read: http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01286.2012
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Abstract

Bronchodilatory response to deep inspiration in bronchial segments: the effects of stress vs. strain. J Appl Physiol 115: 505-513, 2013. First published May 30, 2013; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01286.2012.-During deep inspirations (DI), a distending force is applied to airway smooth muscle (ASM; i.e., stress) and the muscle is lengthened (i.e., strain), which produces a transient reversal of bronchoconstriction (i.e., bronchodilation). The aim of the present study was to determine whether an increase in ASM stress or the accompanying increase in strain mediates the bronchodilatory response to DI. We used whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro and a servo-controlled syringe pump that applied fixed-transmural pressure (Ptm) or fixed-volume oscillations, simulating tidal breathing and DI. The relationship between ASM stress and strain during oscillation was altered by increasing doses of acetylcholine, which stiffened the airway wall, or by changing the rate of inflation during DI, which utilized the viscous properties of the intact airway. Bronchodilation to DI was positively correlated with ASM strain (range of r values from 0.81 to 0.95) and negatively correlated with stress (range of r values from -0.42 to -0.98). Fast fixed-Ptm DI produced greater bronchodilation than slow DI, despite less ASM strain. Fast fixed-volume DI produced greater bronchodilation than slow DI, despite identical ASM strain. We show that ASM strain, rather than stress, is the critical determinant of bronchodilation and, unexpectedly, that the rate of inflation during DI also impacts on bronchodilation, independent of the magnitudes of either stress or strain.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: American Physiological Society
Copyright: © 2013 the American Physiological Society.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/31943
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