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Driving electric vehicles at highway speeds: The effect of higher driving speeds on energy consumption and driving range for electric vehicles in Australia

Wager, G., Whale, J. and Bräunl, T. (2016) Driving electric vehicles at highway speeds: The effect of higher driving speeds on energy consumption and driving range for electric vehicles in Australia. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 63 . pp. 158-165.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.05.060
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Abstract

Electric vehicles (EVs) have the potential to operate emission free and thus overcome many environmental and health issues associated with cars run on fossil fuels. Recharging time and driving range are amongst the biggest hurdles for the mainstream acceptance and implementation of EV technology. Fast-DC charging significantly reduces the recharging time and can be used to make longer EV trips possible, e.g. on highways between cities. Although some EV and hybrid car studies have been conducted that address separately issues such as limited drivable ranges, charge stations, impact from auxiliary loads on vehicle energy consumption and emissions, there is currently limited research on the impact on drivable range from the combination of driving EVs at highway speeds, using auxiliary loads such as heating or air conditioning (AC), and reduced charge capacity from fast-DC charging and discharge safety margins. In this study we investigate these parameters and their impact on energy consumption and drivable range of EVs. Our results show a significantly reduced range under conditions relevant for highway driving and significant deviation from driving ranges published by EV manufacturers. The results and outcomes of this project are critical for the efficient design and implementation of so-called ‘Electric Highways’. To prevent stranded cars and a possible negative perception of EVs, drivers and charging infrastructure planners need be aware of how EV energy and recharging demands can significantly change under different loads and driving patterns.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/31284
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