Catalog Home Page

Does home education ‘Work’? Challenging the assumptions behind the home education movement

Lubienski, C. and Brewer, J. (2015) Does home education ‘Work’? Challenging the assumptions behind the home education movement. In: Rothermel, P., (ed.) International Perspectives on Home Education: Do We Still Need Schools? Palgrave Macmillan UK, pp. 136-147.

Link to Published Version: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057%2F9781137...
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Presently, there is a growing force that seeks to promote the privatization of what has traditionally been understood best as a collective. Despite notions of what is best for the collective good, notions of privatization and individualization elevate the individual over the public masses. Finding roots in the economic theories of Milton Friedman, the elevation of the individual over the collective good is fostered by a removal or withdrawal from government institutions in favour of markets. In many such areas of social life, people are withdrawing from the common institutions that have defined social life in market democracies over the last century (Putnam, 1993, 2000; R. B. Reich, 1995). Of great interest is how this phenomenon and ideology specifically impacts educational practice, a cornerstone of democracy.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: Sir Walter Murdoch School of Public Policy and International Affairs
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright: 2015 Christopher Lubienski and T. Jameson Brewer
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/31190
Item Control Page Item Control Page