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Investigation into improving the operation of the existing wind diesel power system and considerations for future grid tied solar PV on the Island of Nevis, West Indies

Kelly, Jonathan (2015) Investigation into improving the operation of the existing wind diesel power system and considerations for future grid tied solar PV on the Island of Nevis, West Indies. Other thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

In 2010, Nevis became the first Eastern Caribbean Island to have a grid tied wind farm operating in tandem with an existing diesel generator fleet. However, due to the old age of the existing diesels and the lack of a unified automated control system to govern the wind diesel system operation, the full possible fuel savings are not being realised.

The following report examines the existing Nevis Island wind diesel system, and uses literature reviews and a case study of the high penetration wind diesel system at Coral Bay Western Australia, to derive possible solutions for improving the Nevis Island wind diesel system. Through the use of HOMER simulations based on an automated Nevis Island wind diesel system, the project research shows that the existing 2.2MW wind farm can achieve a maximum annual wind energy penetration of 10%. This is a 2 % increase over the present average annual wind energy penetration and translates into an annual fuel savings of approximately 2,039 kL.

Further investigations carried out in this report, looked at the benefits to be derived from installing new diesel generators. The HOMER simulation results show that the annual wind energy penetration level remains the same for the existing wind farm capacity, however with the use of more fuel efficient diesel generators that have lower minimum loadings and better part load efficiencies, the annual diesel fuel consumption is further reduced.

As Nevis has a good solar radiation resource, the project investigated the combined benefits of increasing installed wind power generation capacity and the addition of grid-tied roof top solar PV on government buildings. Simulations were also done with the inclusion of battery storage which would act as short term spinning reserve to maintain grid frequency stability during rapid variations of the renewable energy resources or sudden load changes.

Overall, each of the scenarios which were simulated in HOMER, indicate that the Nevis Island wind diesel system can be much improved through the deployment of a unified automated control system, new diesel generators and some energy storage, which then allow for an increase in renewable energy penetration into the Nevis Island grid, while maintaining good power quality.

Publication Type: Thesis (Other)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Supervisor: Carter, Craig
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/30760
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