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Borderline Personality Disorder in the perinatal period: early infant and maternal outcomes

Blankley, G., Galbally, M., Snellen, M., Power, J. and Lewis, A.J. (2015) Borderline Personality Disorder in the perinatal period: early infant and maternal outcomes. Australasian Psychiatry, 23 (6). pp. 688-692.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1039856215590254
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Abstract

Objective: This study examines pregnancy and early infant outcomes of pregnant women with a clinical diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder presenting for obstetric services to a major metropolitan maternity hospital in Victoria, Australia.

Method: A retrospective case review of pregnancy and early infant outcomes on 42 women who had been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder via psychiatric assessment using DSM-IV-R criteria was undertaken. Outcomes were compared with a control group of 14,313 consisting of women and infants of non-affected women from the same hospital over the same period of time.

Results: Women presenting for obstetric services with a clinical diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder experienced considerable psychosocial impairment. They anticipated birth as traumatic and frequently requested early delivery. High comorbidity with substance abuse was found and high rates of referral to child protective services. Mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder were significantly more likely to have negative birth outcomes such as lowered Apgar scores, prematurity and special care nursery referral when compared with controls.

Conclusions: These findings offer preliminary evidence to be considered by clinicians in developing treatments and services for the perinatal care of women with Borderline Personality Disorder and their infants. Further research is required in order to develop evidence informed clinical guidelines for the management of women with Borderline Personality Disorder and their infants.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: SAGE
Copyright: © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/30702
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