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Reasons for the euthanasia of dogs and cats in veterinary practices

McMullen, S.L., Clark, W.T. and Robertson, I.D. (2001) Reasons for the euthanasia of dogs and cats in veterinary practices. Australian Veterinary Practitioner, 31 (2). pp. 80-84.

Abstract

A survey of small animal practices in the Melville and Canning local authority areas in Western Australia was carried out to determine the reasons for euthanasia of dogs and cats. Over the six-week period of the survey 90 dogs were euthanased and 107 reasons for this action were recorded. Fifty-seven cats were euthanased and 69 reasons given. Illness was the most common reason for euthanasia of dogs and cats, being recorded in 63% of dogs and 60% of cats. Senility was the second most common reason for dogs (23%) but was less common for cats (9%). Injury was the second most common reason for cat euthanasia (21%) but was less common for dogs (6%). Behaviour problems were involved in 13% of dogs but only one cat was euthanased for unacceptable behaviour. Dogs and cats which were unwanted or could not be looked after by their owners made up 4% and 12% respectively and the cost of treatment was given as a factor in deciding on euthanasia for 8% of dogs and 14% of cats.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/30485
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