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Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors

Trott, D., Jordan, D., Barton, M., Abraham, S. and Groves, M. (2013) Vets versus pets: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Australian animals and their doctors. Microbiology Australia, 34 (1). pp. 25-27.

Free to read: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MA13008
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Abstract

Humans and animals intimately sharing the same environment will inevitably be exposed to each other’s microbiota. When one of those organisms is a drug-resistant pathogen then logistics of disease prevention are raised to a new level of complexity. For this reason the study of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in man and animals is now a priority. Recent research has demonstrated the ease with which MRSA crosses species barriers and the grave potential for MRSA to cause serious disease in animals and man has been well established. However, a key feature of MRSA (as compared zoonotic, resistant Salmonella spp.) is that companion and performance animals appear to have pivotal roles in the ecology of spread of certain genotypes found in humans. In this article we summarise the major developments in animal-human MRSA with an emphasis on the most recent Australian data incriminating involvement of companion and performance animals in the ecology of spread.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/30397
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