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Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentration changes after acute haemorrhage and colloid-mediated reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs

Davis, J., Raisis, A.L., Cianciolo, R.E., Miller, D.W., Shiel, R.E., Nabity, M.B. and Hosgood, G.L. (2016) Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentration changes after acute haemorrhage and colloid-mediated reperfusion in anaesthetized dogs. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 43 (3). pp. 262-270.

Free to read: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vaa.12311
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Abstract

Objective: To determine changes in urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentration (uNGAL) in anaesthetized Greyhound dogs that developed acute tubular damage following haemorrhage and resuscitation with colloid-based fluids. Study design: Prospective experimental study. Animals: Seven healthy adult entire male Greyhound dogs. Methods: During isoflurane anaesthesia, approximately 50 mL kg-1 of blood was removed to maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≤40 mmHg for 1 hour followed by gelatin-based colloid administration to maintain MAP ≥60 mmHg for 3 hours. Data, including oxygen extraction ratio and uNGAL, were collected before (T0) and immediately following (T1) haemorrhage, and hourly during reperfusion (T2-T4). After T4, dogs were euthanized and renal tissue was collected for histology. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated-measures one-way anova. Data are presented as means (95% confidence interval). Results: Histology identified renal tubular epithelial damage in all dogs. Urine NGAL concentration increased from 12.1 (0-30.6) ng mL-1 at T0 to 122.0 (64.1-180.0) ng mL-1 by T3. Compared with T0, uNGAL was significantly higher at T3 (p = 0.016) and was increased 24-fold. Conclusions and clinical relevance: Despite wide individual variation in baseline uNGAL, increases in uNGAL were observed in all dogs, suggesting that this biomarker has the potential to detect renal tubular injury following haemorrhage-induced hypotension and colloid-mediated reperfusion.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright: © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29499
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