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The partial turn to politics in plural policing studies

Scarpello, F. (2016) The partial turn to politics in plural policing studies. Contemporary Politics, 22 (1). pp. 114-123.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569775.2015.1112957
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Abstract

White, Adam (2010), The politics of private security (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan)
Abrahamsen, Rita and Williams, Michael C. (2011), Security beyond the state: Private security in international politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)
Albrecht, Peter and Kyed, Helene M. (Eds.) (2015), Policing and the politics of order-making (Abingdon: Routledge)

Policing is an essentially contested term. At its simplest, it involves organized order maintenance, peace keeping, rule or law enforcement, crime investigation and prevention, and other forms of investigation and associated information brokering, which may involve the conscious exercise of coercive power (Newburn, 2008, p. 217). But policing is also highly political and it entails practices, discourses, arrangements and modes of governance that define the very nature of state-society relations and affect how power is exercised, by whom, and for whose benefit. Critical criminologists have long engaged with the politics of policing and explained, for example, how the state, the police or a social class frame understandings of crime to sustain power relations skewed in regards to class, gender and race (Crowther, 2000; DeKeseredy, 2010; Grover, 2008; Neocleous, 2000). The attention to the politics of policing, however, has not been fully replicated by the scholars that, in the last decades, have left behind a state-centred v

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Management and Governance
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Copyright: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29228
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