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Trypanosomes of Australian mammals: Knowledge gaps regarding transmission and biosecurity

Thompson, C.K. and Thompson, R.C.A. (2015) Trypanosomes of Australian mammals: Knowledge gaps regarding transmission and biosecurity. Trends in Parasitology, 31 (11). pp. 553-562.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2015.06.011
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Abstract

Trypanosomes infect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, and are transmitted by haematophagous invertebrate vectors. Eight native trypanosome species have been described from Australian indigenous mammals, along with other unnamed isolates and genotypes. Associated difficulties relating to the confirmation of cyclical and mechanical vector candidates has hindered vector identification in Australia, with no successful experimental transmission documented for any of these native trypanosomes to indigenous mammals. We discuss pending biosecurity issues, with significant importance placed on the close phylogenetic and phenotypic relationship shared between Trypanosoma cruzi and some Australian trypanosomes. With such a dearth of information, we highlight the importance of keeping an open mind, which considers all possibilities during future investigations of vectors and their associated biosecurity issues in Australia. There are many associated difficulties related to the confirmation of cyclical and mechanical vector candidates; this has hindered the vector identification of Australian native trypanosomes. To date, no successful experimental transmission has been documented for any of the Australian native trypanosomes to its indigenous mammals. There are many pending biosecurity issues facing Australian wildlife, domestic animals, and citizens, with a significant importance placed on the close inferred phylogenetic and phenotypic relationship shared between Trypanosoma cruzi and other Australian trypanosomes. With such a dearth of information, it is important to keep an open mind, and consider all possibilities during future investigations of vectors and their associated biosecurity issues in Australia.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29008
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