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Targeted development of a microsatellite marker associated with a true loose smut resistance gene in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

Li, C., Eckstein, P.E., Lu, M., Rossnagel, B.G. and Scoles, G.J. (2001) Targeted development of a microsatellite marker associated with a true loose smut resistance gene in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Molecular Breeding, 8 (3). pp. 235-242.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1013738108871
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Abstract

Microsatellite markers have many of the properties of an ideal marker, but development of microsatellite markers is tedious, time-consuming and expensive. In the past few years, great efforts have been made to develop, map and utilize microsatellite markers in various crops. It is still a major challenge to find a microsatellite marker associated with an economically important trait. In the present study we report on the targeted development of a microsatellite marker to a barley disease resistance gene. The method includes the following steps: (1) pooling DNA samples from a segregating population based on the principle of bulked-segregant analysis; (2) digesting the pooled DNAs and ligating adaptors; (3) selectively amplifying and identifying polymorphic microsatellites; and (4) developing primers for the microsatellite associated with the targeted trait. Using this method, a microsatellite marker associated with the true loose smut resistance gene (Un8) in the Harrington × TR306 doubled-haploid population was identified. This marker showed polymorphism in four breeding populations segregating for true loose smut resistance. In three of these populations, genetic distance between the microsatellite and the true loose smut resistance gene varied from 8.6 to 10.3 cM. Polymorphism of the microsatellite was tested among three disease resistant lines and 21 susceptible cultivars. Fourteen to eighteen of the 21 susceptible cultivars exhibited a polymorphism for the microsatellite with respect to at least one of the disease-resistant lines. This method for the targeted development of microsatellite markers should have widespread applicability and should efficiently provide highly polymorphic markers for use in breeding programs.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/28841
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