Catalog Home Page

A biological survey of Lord Howe Island with recommendations for the conservation of the island's wildlife

Recher, H.F. and Clark, S.S. (1974) A biological survey of Lord Howe Island with recommendations for the conservation of the island's wildlife. Biological Conservation, 6 (4). pp. 263-273.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-3207(74)90005-6
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Lord Howe Island is located in the southwest Pacific Ocean about 720 km northeast of Sydney, Australia. The island was discovered in 1788, but has never had a large human population nor has it been intensively developed. It remains, therefore, in a substantially natural state and because of the high proportion of endemic species is of considerable interest to biologists. However, new development is possible and during 1971 and 1972 the Australian Museum co-ordinated a biological survey of Lord Howe. The object of the survey was to ascertain the status of the island's wildlife and to recommend ways to ensure its survival. The survey concluded that the status of most of the island's indigenous wildlife was satisfactory, but that a few species were threatened and that a number of introduced plants and animals were causing problems. Recommendations were made to control exotic species, to reserve the remaining natural vegetation and to base the tourist industry on the island's existing natural values including its wildlife.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/28434
Item Control Page Item Control Page