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SYMPOSIUM: Impact of the systemic response to stressors and subclinical and clinical infection on intestinal barrier function and growth in pigs

Kim, J.C., Mullan, B.P. and Pluske, J.R. (2013) SYMPOSIUM: Impact of the systemic response to stressors and subclinical and clinical infection on intestinal barrier function and growth in pigs. In: Manipulating Pig Production XIV. Proceedings of the 14th Australasian Pig Science Association (APSA) Biennial Conference, 24 - 27 November, Melbourne, Australia pp. 61-76.

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Abstract

Chronic exposure to clinical/subclinical infection and stressors compromises intestinal barrier function and activates a systemic response which reduces the rate of protein deposition and growth efficiency. The systemic response influences performance of pigs in two ways: alteration of nutrient partitioning and eicosanoid mediator-induced neurological responses to infection such as anorexia. The roles of nutrition to tackle both routs of the systemic response are reviewed. Evidence is provided that the systemic responses alter nutrient partitioning and increase requirements for tryptophan and sulphur amino acids. Nutrients that reduce either cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activity or cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase gene expressions, and hence minimise production of eicosanoid mediators such as prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4, includes omega-3 fatty acids, boron, probiotics and antioxidants. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of several nutritional strategies to minimise impacts of chronic subclinical infection and stressors on the efficiency of pork production.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Australasian Pig Science Association
Copyright: © Australasian Pig Science Association 2013
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/28222
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