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Foraging ecology and habitat selection of the yellow-plumed honeyeater, Lichenostomus ornatus, in a Western Australian woodland: Implications for conservation

Wilson, K. and Recher, H.F. (2001) Foraging ecology and habitat selection of the yellow-plumed honeyeater, Lichenostomus ornatus, in a Western Australian woodland: Implications for conservation. Emu, 101 (1). pp. 89-94.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MU00068
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Abstract

At Dryandra in Western Australia, Yellow-plumed Honeyeaters preferred the more productive woodlands dominated by Wandoo, Eucalyptus wandoo, to those on poorer soils dominated by Powderbark Wandoo, E. accedens. They foraged mainly by gleaning and probing foliage and bark within the canopy of the largest trees. Insects were also taken by hawking, hovering, and snatching, but there were significant spatial and seasonal differences in the use of foraging substrates. Little nectar-feeding was recorded, but lerp, manna, and honeydew obtained from foliage and under bark were likely energy sources. Although the minimum area of habitat required for the conservation of Yellow-plumed Honeyeaters cannot be specified, it probably needs to be large, productive, little disturbed, and with mature eucalypts to ensure a diversity of foraging substrates. Access to a source of nectar for at least part of the year may also be necessary.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: © Royal Australian Ornithologists Union 2001
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/27296
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