Catalog Home Page

Pathogenicity test of Western Australian isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in canola

Hidayah, B.N., Dell, B., Khangura, R., Burgess, T. and Bräu, L. (2013) Pathogenicity test of Western Australian isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in canola. In: 15th International Sclerotinia Workshop, 20 - 24 August, Wuhan, China.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Presentation)
Download (2MB)

Abstract

Stem rot disease caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum has emerged as a serious problem on canola (Brassica napus L.) production in Western Australia (WA) over the past few years where crop losses can be up to 40% in the worst affected crops. Hundreds of isolates of S. sclerotiorum have been collected from different canola growing regions of WA. As the majority of WA isolates of S. sclerotiorum have not been analyzed for their genetic characterization, analysis of genetic variation of WA isolates will be undertaken using classical and molecular techniques such as pathogenicity test, mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs), ITS sequencing, and cluster analysis. The experiments which started in March 2013, aim to use classical and molecular tools to identify groups of WA isolates of S. sclerotiorum from which isolates will be selected for the main studies on the management of S. sclerotiorum in canola. Accurate information of genetic diversity through research on characterization of the pathogen will lead to better understanding of the pathogen and will also benefit the breeding programs particularly aiming at breeding for disease resistance and moreover, could lead to developing better techniques for managing the disease. The paper provides an outline of the experiments and preliminary results.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Huazhong Agriculture University and The Oil Crops Research Institute of The Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/27189
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year