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Temporal discourse and the news media representation of Indigenous- non-Indigenous relations: A case study from Aotearoa New Zealand

Love, T. and Tilley, E. (2013) Temporal discourse and the news media representation of Indigenous- non-Indigenous relations: A case study from Aotearoa New Zealand. Media International Australia (149). pp. 174-188.

Abstract

Time is a particularly powerful construct in postcolonial societies. Intermeshed with discourses of race, place and belonging, European ideas of time as linear, Cartesian and chronological function as enduring discursive categories that frame public debate within conceptual legacies from colonialism. There is substantial evidence internationally that modernist and mechanical temporal discourses of progress and efficiency have impeded Indigenous aspirations, including attempts to achieve sovereignty. In this article, we use a critical whiteness studies framework, and a critical discourse analysis methodology, to make visible the temporal assumptions in mainstream news articles from Aotearoa New Zealand. These articles, from influential, agenda-setting media, discuss crucial issues of indigenous rights, including Te Tiriti o Waitangi negotiations. Our analysis shows that they do so within a culturally specific, Western temporal framework, which limits their ability to provide balanced, informative coverage of the issues at stake.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Arts
Publisher: University of Queensland Press
Publishers Website: http://www.uq.edu.au/mia/
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/26935
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