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Starting points and pathways in Aboriginal students’ learning of number: recognising different world views

Treacy, K., Frid, S. and Jacob, L. (2014) Starting points and pathways in Aboriginal students’ learning of number: recognising different world views. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 27 (3). pp. 263-281.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13394-014-0123-x
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Abstract

This research was designed to investigate the conceptualisations and thinking strategies Indigenous Australian students use in counting tasks. Eighteen Aboriginal students, in years 1 to 11 at a remote community school, were interviewed using standard counting tasks and a ‘counting’ task that involved fetching ‘maku’ (witchetty grubs) to have enough to give a maku to each person in a picture. The tasks were developed with, and the interviews conducted by, an Aboriginal research assistant, to ensure appropriate cultural and language contexts. A main finding was that most of the students did not see the need to use counting to make equivalent sets, even though they were able to demonstrate standard counting skills. The findings highlight a need to further examine the world views, orientations and related mathematical concepts and processes that Indigenous students bring to school.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Springer Verlag
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/26760
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