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Finding privacy from a public death: A qualitative exploration of how a dedicated space for end-of-life care in an acute hospital impacts on dying patients and their families

Slatyer, S., Pienaar, C., Williams, A.M., Proctor, K. and Hewitt, L. (2015) Finding privacy from a public death: A qualitative exploration of how a dedicated space for end-of-life care in an acute hospital impacts on dying patients and their families. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24 (15-16). pp. 2164-2174.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.12845
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Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:
To explore the experiences and perceptions of hospital staff caring for dying patients in a dedicated patient/family room (named Lotus Room).

BACKGROUND:
Dying in hospital is a common outcome for people across the world. However, noise and activity in acute environments present barriers to quality end-of-life care. This is of concern because care provided to dying patients has been shown to affect both the patients and the bereaved families.

DESIGN:
A qualitative descriptive approach was used.

METHODS:
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 multidisciplinary staff and seven families provided information through an investigator-developed instrument.

RESULTS:
Qualitative data analysis generated three categories describing: Dying in an hospital; The Lotus Room; and the Outcomes for patients and families. The Lotus Room was seen as a large, private and, ultimately, safe space for patients and families within the public hospital environment. Family feedback supported staff perspectives that the Lotus Room facilitated family presence and communication.

CONCLUSIONS:
The privacy afforded by the Lotus Room within this acute hospital provided benefits for the dying patients and grieving families. Improved outcomes included a peaceful death for patients, which may have assisted the family with their bereavement.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:
This study provides evidence of how the physical environment can address well-established barriers to quality end-of-life care in acute hospitals.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright: © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/26740
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