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Impact of phosphorus placement methods after three years of different tillage practices on maize productivity and soil properties

Khairul Alam, Md., Salahin, N., Pathan, S., begum, R.A., Mondol, A.T.M.A.I. and Bell, R.W. (2014) Impact of phosphorus placement methods after three years of different tillage practices on maize productivity and soil properties. In: Proceedings of the conference on conservation agriculture for smallholders in Asia and Africa, 7 - 11 December, Mymensingh, Bangladesh pp. 139-140.

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Abstract

Minimal soil disturbance under conservation agriculture may limit the supply of immobile nutrients (such as phosphorus) to plant roots due to stratification of these nutrients close to the soil surface. Maize (Zea mays L.) roots usually do not proliferate into the middle of the rows until the plant has six to seven fully emerged leaves but a high P concentration in maize prior to the 6-leaf stage will significantly increase final grain yield (Aldrich et al. 1986). Phosphorus availability is critical during the early stages of plant growth when the movement of P to plant roots (P absorption by the plant) is reduced with cold soil temperatures (Alley et al. 2009). This can occur during winter (rabi season) when most maize is grown in Bangladesh (Ali et al. 2009). Also P moves very little in soils, and thus, available soil P levels can be built with P fertilizer application appropriate for the tillage practice. The aim of present study was to determine the effects of tillage practices and P placement methods on soil physical, chemical and yield of maize crops on a Grey Terrace Soil in Bangladesh.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/26158
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