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Row spacing, herbicides and nitrogen effect on crop-weed competition in cereal-broadleaf crop rotation

Hashem, A., Vance, W., Brennan, R. and Bell, R.W. (2014) Row spacing, herbicides and nitrogen effect on crop-weed competition in cereal-broadleaf crop rotation. In: Proceedings of the conference on conservation agriculture for smallholders in Asia and Africa, 7 - 11 December, Mymensingh, Bangladesh pp. 114-115.

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Abstract

Proximity factors such as row spacing change the spatial distribution of crop plants and alters the intensity of crop-weed competition (Fischer and Miles 1973). Narrow row spacing is likely to facilitate crop plants with greater competitive ability than weeds, compared to wide row spacing (Hashem et al. 1998). In dry land conservation agriculture (CA), wide rows may ensure some temporal and spatial water availability at critical crop growth stages to ensure profitable yields. However, good weed management becomes critical to the success of wide row systems, as failure to control water-using weeds defeats the purpose of wide row cropping where water conservation is the focus. Management of nitrogen (N) also greatly affects the growth of weeds. While weeds may have easy access to applied N if top-dressed on the soil surface at sowing time, strategic N application technique may maximise the access of crop plants to N compared to weed plants such as annual ryegrass. This study was undertaken to examine the interaction of N rate (and N application technique) and weed control options under normal and wide row spacing in a wheat –lupin–canola rotation in CA.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/26155
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