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The association of sporadic inclusion body myositis and Sjögren's syndrome in carriers of HLA-DR3 and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype

Rojana-udomsart, A., Needham, M., Luo, Y.B., Fabian, V., Walters, S., Zilko, P.J. and Mastaglia, F.L. (2011) The association of sporadic inclusion body myositis and Sjögren's syndrome in carriers of HLA-DR3 and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 113 (7). pp. 559-563.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2011.03.016
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Abstract

Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) usually occurs as an isolated condition, but it may occur in association with another autoimmune disorder such as Sjögren's syndrome. We reviewed sIBM cases with Sjögren's syndrome (sIBM/SS) from the Perth Inflammatory Myopathies Database to determine whether they are distinguishable from other sIBM cases. Six such cases were identified, representing 12% of all sIBM cases. Muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of an inflammatory myopathy with rimmed vacuoles and the characteristic muscle fibre inclusions of sIBM. Five of the six were females, contrasting with a 2:1 male preponderance in the rest of the sIBM cohort. The mean age-at-onset and the pattern of muscle weakness were similar in the two groups. Four out of five sIBM/SS patients treated with immune therapies had improvement in muscle strength lasting for 6–24 months, whereas only 27% of other sIBM patients improved. All 6 patients with sIBM/SS carried the HLA-DRB1*0301 allele, or its equivalent HLA-DR3 serological specificity, compared with 83% of other sIBM cases and all carried some or all of the major markers of the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype which is also associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Patients with sIBM/SS represent a subgroup of sIBM cases who are more likely to be female and carriers of HLA-DR3 and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype, and are more likely to respond to treatment. The association of sIBM and Sjögren's syndrome is likely to be due to a common genetic predisposition linked to the MHC and supports the notion that sIBM has an autoimmune basis.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Copyright: 2011 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25480
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