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Northeast Asian resource security strategies and international resource politics in Asia

Wilson, J.D. (2014) Northeast Asian resource security strategies and international resource politics in Asia. Asian Studies Review, 38 (1). pp. 15-35.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357823.2013.853027
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Abstract

Soaring prices for minerals and energy are posing a major threat to the resource security of economies in Asia. As a result, many regional governments have launched new resource security strategies in the last few years. Most recent attention to resource security in Asia has focused on debating whether the Chinese government's resource policies are mercantilist or liberal. This China-focused debate is too narrow to fully capture the nature of resource politics in Northeast Asia, since the governments of Japan and Korea have also recently launched their own resource security strategies. This paper considers regional-level trends in Asian resource politics by examining the causes, content and implications of the resource security strategies deployed by the consumer governments in Northeast Asia. It argues that growing resource security concerns, combined with a process of competitive policy emulation, have seen the Chinese, Japanese and Korean governments each adopt mercantilist resource security strategies over the last decade. Furthermore, the competitive nature of these mercantilist strategies is acting to intensify political and economic competition for resources between the Asian region's three main economic powers.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Asia Research Centre
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Copyright: © 2014 Asian Studies Association of Australia.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25334
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