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Introducing the consolidated species concept to resolve species in the Teratosphaeriaceae

Quaedvlieg, W., Binder, M., Groenewald, J.Z., Summerell, B.A., Carnegie, A.J., Burgess, T.I. and Crous, P.W. (2014) Introducing the consolidated species concept to resolve species in the Teratosphaeriaceae. Persoonia - Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi, 33 (1). pp. 1-40.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3767/003158514X681981
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Abstract

The Teratosphaeriaceae represents a recently established family that includes numerous saprobic, extremophilic, human opportunistic, and plant pathogenic fungi. Partial DNA sequence data of the 28S rRNA and RPB2 genes strongly support a separation of the Mycosphaerellaceae from the Teratosphaeriaceae, and also provide support for the Extremaceae and Neodevriesiaceae, two novel families including many extremophilic fungi that occur on a diversity of substrates. In addition, a multi-locus DNA sequence dataset was generated (ITS, LSU, Btub, Act, RPB2, EF-1 alpha and Cal) to distinguish taxa in Mycosphaerella and Teratosphaeria associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus, leading to the introduction of 23 novel genera, five species and 48 new combinations. Species are distinguished based on a polyphasic approach, combining morphological, ecological and phylogenetic species concepts, named here as the Consolidated Species Concept (CSC). From the DNA sequence data generated, we show that each one of the five coding genes tested, reliably identify most of the species present in this dataset (except species of Pseudocercospora). The ITS gene serves as a primary barcode locus as it is easily generated and has the most extensive dataset available, while either Btub, EF-1 alpha or RPB2 provide a useful secondary barcode locus.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Nationaal Herbarium Nederland
Copyright: © 2014 Naturalis Biodiversity Center & Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25271
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