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A controlled trial of health promotion programs in 11-year-olds using physical activity “enrichment” for higher risk children

Burke, V., Milligan, R.A.K., Thompson, C., Taggart, A.C., Dunbar, D.L., Spencer, M.J., Medland, A., Gracey, M.P., Vandongen, R. and Beilin, L.J. (1998) A controlled trial of health promotion programs in 11-year-olds using physical activity “enrichment” for higher risk children. The Journal of Pediatrics, 132 (5). pp. 840-848.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(98)70315-4
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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the short and long term benefits of a school and home based physical activity “enrichment” program for children at higher risk of cardiovascular disease as identified by cluster analysis. Study Design: During two 10-week school terms, 800 11-year-olds took part in a randomized controlled trial with the standard physical activity and nutrition program in six schools, the standard program in a further seven schools but with the addition of physical activity enrichment for higher risk children in those schools, and no program in five control schools. Cluster analysis identifying the 29% or so highest risk children used systolic blood pressure, percent body fat, physical fitness, and blood cholesterol. Results: Fitness improved significantly in program schools, particularly with enrichment in higher risk boys. Substantial improvements persisted 6 months later in girls from program schools. At “Enrichment” schools, cholesterol showed significant benefits in higher risk girls and, 6 months later, in both boys and higher risk girls. Sodium intake and, in girls, subscapular skinfolds were lower in “Enrichment” schools when the program ended, but not 6 months later. Conclusion: Two-semester health programs with physical activity enrichment for higher risk children can produce benefits sustained for at least 6 months. Improvements extend to lower risk children exposed indirectly to the enrichment. Attenuation of effects on diet and body composition in the longer-term suggest the need for on-going programs.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 1998 Mosby, Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/24892
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