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Vegetative propagation of Eucalyptus using tissue culture and its application to forest improvement in Western Australia

McComb, J.A. and Bennett, I.J. (1982) Vegetative propagation of Eucalyptus using tissue culture and its application to forest improvement in Western Australia. In: Plant tissue culture 1982 : proceedings of the 5th International Congress of Plant Tissue and Cell Culture, 11 - 16 July, Tokyo and Lake Yamanaka, Japan pp. 721-722.

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Abstract

Conventional vegetative propagation from mature eucalypts is not possible for most species, but micropropagation has been successfully used for several species (1, 2). Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata Sm.), is an important forest species limited to Western Australia. There are some 1,400,000 ha. in state forest reserves, but 280,000 ha. of these have already been affected by dieback and the increase in a year may be up to 16,000 ha. A root pathogen, Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands appears responsible for the disease (3). Another serious pest is the leaf miner (Perthida glyphopa Common), a moth whose larvae damage leaf tissue (4). Healthy trees are occasionally found in dieback sites, and trees apparently resistant to leaf miner occur in the forest. We wish to clone these trees and test them for genotypically controlled resistance.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Publisher: Japanese Association for Plant Tissue Culture
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/24774
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