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Psychosocial predictors of antiracist bystander action toward indigenous Australians.

Redmond, J.D., Pedersen, A. and Paradies, Y. (2014) Psychosocial predictors of antiracist bystander action toward indigenous Australians. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 20 (4). pp. 474-490.

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Abstract

Racism toward Indigenous people remains a social problem in Australian culture, and racial abuse is part of that social problem. In this research, we investigated whether internal and external motivations, being open-minded, and having racist attitudes predicted the intention to engage in bystander action in support of Indigenous Australians in situations deemed low- and high-risk to personal safety. A total of 168 non-Indigenous community participants completed an anonymous online survey in Perth, Western Australia. In the low-risk scenario, low levels of racism, high internal motivation, and openness predicted the intention to engage in bystander action. In the high-risk scenario, participants with lower levels of racism and being female were more likely to engage in bystander action in support of Indigenous Australians. Coupled with previous research in the field, our findings suggest that internalized values relating to antiracist sentiments are significant predictors of antiracist bystander action.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Copyright: 2014 American Psychological Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/24481
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