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Piecing together the interwar disarmament puzzle: Trends and possibilities

Webster, A. (2004) Piecing together the interwar disarmament puzzle: Trends and possibilities. International Journal: Canada's Journal of Global Policy Analysis, 59 (1). pp. 187-198.

Link to Published Version: http://ijx.sagepub.com/content/59/1/187.citation
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Abstract

DISARMAMENT AS A MODERN PHENOMENON has its roots in the success and, more often, the failure of international disarmament initiatives during the period between the two world wars. Set in motion in 1919 by the Treaty of Versailles, which followed four years of horror on an unprecedented scale, the interwar disarmament process culminated in the fiasco of the little-remembered World Disarmament Conference of 1932-1934. In his closing speech to the first session of the conference in July 1932, French prime minister Edouard Herriot was moved to comment on the lack of achievement: "There have been times when we may have wondered whether the verb 'to disarm' was not in every language an irregular verb, with no first person, and only conjugated in the future tense."'1 Such failure has led most commentators to dismiss interwar disarmament efforts as either worthless, hopelessly naive or simply irrelevant...

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: SAGE
Copyright: 2004 Canadian International Council
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/23957
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