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The United Nations and State Sovereignty: Mechanism for Managing International Security

Makinda, S.M. (1998) The United Nations and State Sovereignty: Mechanism for Managing International Security. Australian Journal of Political Science, 33 (1). pp. 101-115.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10361149850750
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Abstract

Recently, some analysts have accused the United Nations of eroding the sovereignty of its members. However, these critics often ignore the fact that the creation of the United Nations was itself one incident in the process of reinterpreting sovereignty which has gone on for centuries. Before 1945, sovereignty was often reinterpreted to fit the changing norms and institutions. As a principle which legitimises political control and helps enhance international security, sovereignty often reflects the prevailing notions of international order. While the Security Council has tried to redefine sovereignty after the cold war, the UN Charter remains a constraint on such reinterpretation. If the Charter is not amended to reflect post-cold war changes, the international society might be split between supporters of the Charter principles of sovereignty and those who seek change.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Politics and International Studies
Publisher: Routledge
Copyright: Australasian Political Studies Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/23243
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