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Attributions of humanness to groups — should we stop getting all emotional or is that just human nature?

Bain, P., Haslan, N. and Kashima, Y. (2006) Attributions of humanness to groups — should we stop getting all emotional or is that just human nature? In: 35th Annual Meeting of the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists (SASP), 20-23 April 2006, Canberra, Australia.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049530600940015
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Abstract

Research in the area of infrahumanisation has consistently shown that people reserve the ability to experience uniquely human emotions to members of their ingroups over outgroups. However, it is presently not clear whether this differential attribution of humanness extends beyond emotions, in particular to the values attributed to groups. Moreover, following a recently-identified empirical distinction between characteristics that are “uniquely human” and “human nature”, we examine which conception of humanness provides a better explanation for this phenomenon. We report two studies that show the central role of “human nature” beliefs in attributions of both emotions and values to groups. The findings point to possible cultural differences in group-based attributions of humanness.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: The Australian Psychological Association
Copyright: The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/22521
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