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Origins of grape and wine aroma. Part 1. Chemical components and viticultural impacts

Robinson, A.L., Boss, P.K., Solomon, P.S., Trengove, R.D., Heymann, H. and Ebeler, S.E. (2014) Origins of grape and wine aroma. Part 1. Chemical components and viticultural impacts. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, 65 (1). pp. 1-24.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.5344/ajev.2013.12070
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Abstract

Wine is an ancient beverage and has been prized throughout time for its unique and pleasing favor. Wine favor arises from a mixture of hundreds of chemical components interacting with our sense organs, producing a neural response that is processed in the brain and resulting in a psychophysical percept that we readily describe as "wine." The chemical components of wine are derived from multiple sources; during fermentation grape favor components are extracted into the wine and new compounds are formed by numerous chemical and biochemical processes. In this review we discuss the various classes of chemical compounds in grapes and wines and the chemical and biochemical processes that influence their formation and concentrations. The overall aim is to highlight the current state of knowledge in the area of grape and wine aroma chemistry.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Separation Science and Metabolomics Laboratory
Publisher: American Society for Enology and Viticulture
Copyright: © 2014 by the American Society for Enology and Viticulture
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/22389
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