Catalog Home Page

Human Rights and Community Development in a U.S. Army Village in Okinawa

Tanji, M. (2011) Human Rights and Community Development in a U.S. Army Village in Okinawa. New Community Quarterly, 9 (1). pp. 5-11.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Approximately 909 United States military facilities and 190,000 troops, located in 46 countries, represent the unparalleled ‘bases of empire’ today (Lutz 2009:1). The presence of Uncle Sam has been the reality for the post- World War II Asia-Pacific region, especially in Japan, Korea and the Philippines (also in Thailand and Australia). Detrimental impacts on local societies inflicted by the U.S. military presence are recognised most commonly in terms of a diplomatic thorn in the side of stable bilateral alliances between the U.S. and the host countries of its troops. When local residents’ safety, dignity and well-being are threatened by U.S. military accidents and crimes, I argue, it is the ‘human rights’ of the individual residents that are being violated by the state.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: New Community
Copyright: The Author
Publishers Website: http://community.borderlands.org.au
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/22348
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year