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Remaining vigilant for the exotic: cases of imported canine leishmaniosis in Australia 2000-2011

Cleare, E., Mason, K., Mills, J., Gabor, M. and Irwin, P.J. (2014) Remaining vigilant for the exotic: cases of imported canine leishmaniosis in Australia 2000-2011. Australian Veterinary Journal, 92 (4). pp. 119-127.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avj.12154
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Abstract

Background: Canine leishmaniosis (CL) caused by Leishmania infantum is a disease of worldwide importance, not only because it causes severe and potentially fatal disease in dogs, but also because of its zoonotic relevance. The parasite is the causative agent of human visceral leishmaniosis, a severe, debilitating disease that causes an estimated 59,000 deaths annually. Australia is considered to be free of zoonotic leishmaniosis. Methods: A retrospective case series of five imported dogs diagnosed with CL between 2000 and 2011. Cases were identified by word-of-mouth and by referral. Results: The dogs were diagnosed with CL between 2000 and 2011; clinical, clinicopathological, and serological data are presented, together with a review of the disease and its biosecurity implications for Australia. Conclusions: Because of the unique immunopathology and diagnostic challenges associated with CL, the importance of obtaining a travel history is reinforced because some dogs imported prior to 2006 may develop clinical signs of this disease and present for veterinary examination. Furthermore, it is possible for leishmaniosis to become established within Australia under certain circumstances.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21971
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