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The Schooling of Ethics

Hill, B.V. (2014) The Schooling of Ethics. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 46 (3). pp. 296-310.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-5812.2011.00832.x
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Abstract

Growing concern about a shrinking cultural consensus on values, coupled with religious pluralisation and the realisation that schooling is not, and cannot be, value-neutral,have led to proposals to teach ethics in schools, interpreted as a contribution of the discipline of philosophy to the common curriculum. To the extent that this approach is seen to hinge on the alleged autonomy of ethics, it has the potential to indoctrinate the contestable view that rationality is the prime motivator of moral commitment. A case is made for regarding philosophical ethics and religious (or world-view) studies not as alternative avenues to values education but each as a core curriculum priority, different but complementary to the other in its content.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Copyright: © 2012 Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21948
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