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Composite Regional Development: A multi-dimensional exercise

Wong, S. and Booth, M. (2003) Composite Regional Development: A multi-dimensional exercise. In: International Sustainability Conference, 17 - 19 September, Fremantle, Western Australia

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Abstract

Economic globalisation together with rapid technological change is producing deep and accelerated industrial and social change around the world. These same forces also offer new opportunities to advance city and regional development through the growth of innovative industries, services and the deployment of new technologies. To date policies have been singular in their purpose. This approach has produced the required impact but with unintended, often deleterious side effects. In the face of such rapid development, a multi-dimensional approach based on a composite exercise that addresses environmental, economic and social issues smoothly and compositely is proposed. Composite exercises are used by personal trainers to simultaneously exercise more than one muscle group to achieve increased muscle tone and various other side benefits. One example is doing squats. Various muscle groups in the bottom (gluteals), upper-leg (quadriceps) and abdominal muscles are toned at the same time. Other side benefits include greater stability of balance and increased tone in an inner lower abdominal muscle which contributes to the control of incontinence. Governments likewise need to realise that their actions are not linear but like personal training, are composite in effect. Taking consideration of such an outcome this paper examines the use of information communication technologies as a composite driver to assist regional communities express their vision for sustainable environmental, economic and social development in the twenty-first century.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21687
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