Catalog Home Page

Connecting Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory’s information-processing styles with organizational influencing tactics: Rational thinkers are rational persuaders

Curtis, G.J. and Lee, M.W.H. (2013) Connecting Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory’s information-processing styles with organizational influencing tactics: Rational thinkers are rational persuaders. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Organisational Psychology, 6 (e2). pp. 1-11.

[img]
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (164kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (353kB)
Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/orp.2013.2
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Several recent studies have connected information-processing styles, as described by Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory (CEST), with important workplace behaviours, including leadership and conflict-handling styles. This article extends such research by examining the connection between CEST information-processing styles and organisational-influencing tactics. In Study 1 (N = 119), the CEST information-processing styles of behavioural coping and rational thinking were positively correlated with the use of rationality as an influencing tactic, as measured by the Profile of Organizational Influence Strategies. In Study 2 (N = 142), a broader self-report measure of influencing tactics was used; behavioural coping and rational thinking were positively correlated with effective influencing tactics such as rational persuasion. Together, behavioural coping and rational thinking accounted for more than 31% of the variance in preference for rational persuasion as an influencing tactic. Additionally, the apprising tactic was positively correlated with both behavioural coping and rational thinking. These findings emphasise the importance of examining individual differences in information processing preferences to understand key elements of organisational behaviour.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Cambridge
Copyright: The Authors
Publishers Website: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJourna...
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21014
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year