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Geographical variation in size of an Australian honeyeater (Aves: Meliphagidae): an example of Bergmann's rule

Wooller, R.D., Saunders, D.A., Bradley, J.S. and Reberia, C.P. (2008) Geographical variation in size of an Australian honeyeater (Aves: Meliphagidae): an example of Bergmann's rule. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 25 (4). pp. 355-363.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.1985.tb00401...
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Abstract

The singing honeyeater, a nectar-feeding bird, is common throughout most of Australia. There is considerable geographical variation in weight, the heaviest birds (30 g) living at the highest latitudes (35°S) and the lightest birds (19 g) at the lowest latitudes (16°S). Clinal variation in weight is apparently related to climatic factors (e.g. potential evapotranspiration) in accord with Bergmann's rule. The exceptions are populations on islands and peninsulas which are about 13% heavier than those on the adjacent mainland.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20910
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