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The impact of selection for leaness on lamb carcase composition, intramuscular fat, and muscle metabolic type, is not influenced by nutritional variation within Australian production systems

Gardner, G.E., Pannier, L., Anderson, F., Kelman, K.R., Williams, A., Jacob, R., Ball, A.J. and Pethick, D. (2011) The impact of selection for leaness on lamb carcase composition, intramuscular fat, and muscle metabolic type, is not influenced by nutritional variation within Australian production systems. In: Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on the Nutrition of Herbivores (ISNH8)., 6 - 9 September, Aberystwyth, Wales UK p. 406.

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Abstract

Introduction - Due to the nutritional importance of iron and zinc in human diets, marketing campaigns for lamb and beef are often focused on these minerals. Iron and zinc are associated with muscle aerobicity which may be diminishing in lamb meat due to selection practices targeting leanness and muscularity to increase lean meat yield (Pannier et al. 2010). Aerobicity of muscle has also been linked to intramuscular fat (IMF) percentage, and like-wise IMF is also depressed through selection for leanness (Gardner et a!. 20 I 0). Poor nutrition will also reduce carcase fatness and JMF, potentially limiting the scope for other genetic factors to impact. Therefore it seems plausible that the impact of selection for leanness will be less in a poor nutrition environment. Thus we hypothesised that selection for leanness would reduce carcase fatness and IMF, reduce aerobicity, and therefore reduce iron and zinc concentration, but these impacts will be depressed within flocks maintained on sites with poorer nutrition.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20820
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