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High-throughput technologies for marker-assisted selection in wheat

Carter, M., Li, D., Cakir, M., McLean, R., Wilson, R., Barclay, I., Loughman, R. and Appels, R. (2004) High-throughput technologies for marker-assisted selection in wheat. In: Plant & Animal Genomes XII Conference, 10 - 14 January 2004, San Diego, CA.

Abstract

Molecular markers have provided plant breeders with the molecular tools to select for plants with the required quality and disease traits during plant breeding. The challenge to plant breeders is to implement these molecular markers into modern breeding programs in a cost-effective and efficient way. Essentially, the screening of a plant during marker-assisted selection (MAS) in a wheat breeding program is a four-step process: (1) collection of leaf samples from the plant to be screened in the field plot or glasshouse trial; (2) the extraction of DNA from the leaf sample; (3) the PCR-based marker assay and fragment analysis, and finally (4) the integration of marker results into breeder’s database. The ability to automate each step is a highly desirable aim to enable the screening of thousands of plants required annually by plant breeders in large breeding populations. This presentation will outline the application of high-throughput methodologies such as DNA extraction from leaf samples collected in a 96 well format, use of the Beckman Biomek 2000 robotic workstation to set up the PCR marker assay, and barcoding to track samples from the field plot to the lab bench. Streamlining of this process will considerably reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of marker-assisted breeding for wheat breeders, ultimately leading to the aim of the release of wheat cultivars with superior agronomic characteristics.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/19363
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