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The incidence and consequences of failure of passive transfer of immunity on a Thoroughbred breeding farm

Raidal, S.L. (1996) The incidence and consequences of failure of passive transfer of immunity on a Thoroughbred breeding farm. Australian Veterinary Journal, 73 (6). pp. 201-206.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.1996.tb10035...
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Abstract

Circulating IgG concentration was determined between 12 and 24 hours after birth for 323 foals born on a Thoroughbred breeding farm over 3 consecutive years. The incidence of failure of passive transfer (FPT) of maternal immunoglobulins (foal circulating IgG concentration < 8 g/L) was found to be 9.6%. Foals born late in the season (October to December) were found to be at increased risk for the development of FPT. The degree of assistance required at parturition and the presence of a periparturient problem in the mare or foal also significantly influenced the subsequent incidence of FPT. Passive immune status significantly influenced the likelihood of foals developing septic illness (joint ill, septicaemia, pneumonia) in the first month of life, but had no significant effect on the development of diarrhoea or Rhodococcus equi pneumonia. The results of the current study support the value of routine monitoring of passive immune status and the early speculative treatment of foals considered to be at risk for the development of FPT.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary Studies
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/19194
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