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The diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with introduced Pinus spp. in the Southern Hemisphere, with particular reference to Western Australia

Dunstan, W.A., Dell, B. and Malajczuk, N. (1998) The diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with introduced Pinus spp. in the Southern Hemisphere, with particular reference to Western Australia. Mycorrhiza, 8 (2). pp. 71-79.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s005720050215
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Abstract

Although pines have been established in plantations in Western Australia for over 100 years, knowledge of the ectomycorrhizal fungal flora is incomplete, or lies in unpublished reports. A survey of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Pinus spp. was conducted throughout south-western Australia. Compared with other regions in the Southern Hemisphere where pines have been introduced, the ectomycorrhizal flora of pines in Western Australia is particularly depauperate, with only nine species of fungi identified from sporocarps and a further two taxa identified from mycorrhizas. Species identified from sporocarps (Hebeloma crustuliniforme, Lactarius deliciosus, Paxillus involutus, Rhizopogon luteolus, R. roseolus, R. vulgaris, Suillus luteus, S. granulatus, Thelephora terrestris) and Cenococcum geophilum are a subset of a larger pine mycorrhizal flora found in eastern Australia, and 8 of the 10 identified species are common to all regions in the Southern Hemisphere where pines have been introduced. These fungi are typically associated with trees, including pines, in the Northern Hemisphere and, apart from Cenococcum geophilum and T. terrestris, are not associated with indigenous vegetation in Western Australia. The mycorrhizal flora colonising roots in a plantation of Pinus radiata D. Don was also investigated, and compared with species identified as present by above-ground sporocarp production. Potential reasons for the limited ectomycorrhizal flora of pines in Western Australia are discussed.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Springer Verlag
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/18337
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