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Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis

Hood, J., Savige, J., Seymour, A., Dowling, J., Martinello, P., Colville, D., Sinclair, R., Naito, I., Jennings, G. and Huxtable, C. (2000) Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 36 (2). pp. 378-391.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/ajkd.2000.8989
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Abstract

Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed α1(IV) and α2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; α3(IV), α4(IV), and α5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the α6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/18290
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