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The effects of Woylie (Bettongia penicillata) foraging on soil water repellency and water infiltration in heavy textured soils in southwestern Australia

Garkaklis, M.J., Bradley, J.S. and Wooller, R.D. (1998) The effects of Woylie (Bettongia penicillata) foraging on soil water repellency and water infiltration in heavy textured soils in southwestern Australia. Austral Ecology, 23 (5). pp. 492-496.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.1998.tb00757...
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Abstract

In the wheatbelt region of Western Australia, brush-tailed bettongs or woylies, Bettongia penicillata, occur in remnant woodlands that have highly water repellent soils. As these marsupials dig for the fruiting bodies of hypogeous fungi they disturb the soil surface. The effect of these diggings was evaluated by laboratory and in situ assessments of soil water repellency. The undisturbed woodland soil surface showed severe water repellence whereas diggings had low water repellence, and appear to act as preferential water infiltration paths after autumn rainfall events. This indicates that Bettongia penicillata has an impact on the non-wetting property of soils in this region.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/18115
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