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No time like the present: Determinants of bystander anti-racism on behalf of Indigenous Australians.

Pedersen, A. and Neto, Y.F. (2013) No time like the present: Determinants of bystander anti-racism on behalf of Indigenous Australians. Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology, 7 (1). pp. 36-49.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/prp.2013.4
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Abstract

The present study explored whether variables previously shown to relate to pro-social attitudes and behaviours could be applied to the intention to engage in bystander anti-racism on behalf of Indigenous Australians. 149 non-Indigenous participants were asked to indicate how likely they were to engage in bystander anti-racism in response to an ‘everyday’ racial discrimination scenario presented within an online survey. Being female, older, and politically left leaning correlated with bystander anti-racism intentions, as did higher levels of collective guilt, anger, empathic concern and lower levels of prejudice. Regression analysis revealed that being older and having higher levels of empathic concern predicted the intention to engage in bystander anti-racism. While it may seem rational that the ability to feel for the plight of another (empathic concern) is necessary for bystander anti-racism to ensue, older individuals may feel more competent in their ability to effectively intervene.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Australian Academic Press Pty Ltd
Copyright: © The Authors 2012
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/18043
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