Catalog Home Page

The loss of seagrasses in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. I. The time course and magnitude of seagrass decline in relation to industrial development

Cambridge, M.L. and McComb, A.J. (1984) The loss of seagrasses in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. I. The time course and magnitude of seagrass decline in relation to industrial development. Aquatic Botany, 20 (3-4). pp. 229-243.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-3770(84)90089-5
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

The areas of seagrass meadows in Cockburn Sound, a marine embayment in Western Australia, were estimated from historical aerial photographs supplemented by ground surveys, studies on meadows in adjoining areas, and coring for rhizome remains. Ten species of seagrasses with different habitat tolerances are recorded for the area, with Posidonia sinuosa Cambridge et Kuo forming the most extensive meadows. It is estimated that from 1954 to 1978 the meadow area was reduced from some 4200 to 900 ha. Based on measurements of aboveground productivity at several sites, this represents a reduction of leaf detritus production from 23 000 to 4000 t (dry wt.) y−1. The major loss of seagrass occurred during a period of industrial development on the shore, and the discharge of effluents rich in plant nutrients.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 1984 Published by Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17465
Item Control Page Item Control Page