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Phenotypic and genetic diversity among rhizobia isolated from three Hedysarum species: H. spinosissimum, H. coronarium and H. flexuosum

Kishinevsky, B.D., Nandasena, K.G., Yates, R.J., Nemas, C. and Howieson, J.G. (2003) Phenotypic and genetic diversity among rhizobia isolated from three Hedysarum species: H. spinosissimum, H. coronarium and H. flexuosum. Plant and Soil, 251 (1). pp. 143-153.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1022967213088
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Abstract

Cultural, physiological and biochemical properties of 18 strains of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of the forage legume H. spinosissimum were compared with those of rhizobia from the related species H. coronarium (15 strains) and H. flexuosum (four strains). On the basis of 43 characteristics the 37 strains of Hedysarum rhizobia could be divided into two groups by numerical analysis. The H. spinosissimum rhizobia formed the first group and the second group comprised the strains from H. coronarium and H. flexuosum. The reference Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae strain 250A was clustered with the rhizobia from H. coronarium and H. flexuosum. By contrast Bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) reference strain 280A was not clustered with any of the strains tested, indicating that the H. spinosissimum rhizobia differ from both Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium. Serological data also discriminate between H. spinosissimum and H. coronariumrhizobia but not between the latter and H. flexuosum strains. The strains tested exhibit a high degree of specificity for nodulation and nitrogen fixation. We also determined the16SrRNA gene sequence of H. spinosissimum rhizobia (four strains), H. coronarium (two strains) and H. flexuosum (two strains) and found that the four H. spinosissimum isolates share a 98% identity among each other in this region but they showed less than 92% identity to the H. coronarium and H. flexuosum isolates. The H. spinosissimum isolates were closely related to both Mesorhizobium loti and M. ciceri, sharing 97% identity with each species.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Rhizobium Studies
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright: 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16954
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