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The effect of associative strength on priming in the cerebral hemispheres

Coney, J. (2002) The effect of associative strength on priming in the cerebral hemispheres. Brain and Cognition, 50 (2). pp. 234-241.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0278-2626(02)00507-9
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Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that semantic memory is more diffusely organized in the right hemisphere of the brain and that words directed to this hemisphere are more likely to activate meanings distantly related to the input. It is argued that this model of language processes predicts that variations in the associative strength of word pairs should give rise to different patterns of priming in each hemisphere. Specifically, the right hemisphere should exhibit relatively more facilitation than the left in response to weaker associative relationships, whereas the left hemisphere should exhibit relatively more facilitation than the right in the context of stronger relationships. This study varied the strength of the semantic association between prime and target in a divided visual field priming procedure. The results were unequivocal in demonstrating similar associative strength functions in each hemisphere, under conditions that encouraged either automatic or controlled processing. Visual field differences in absolute RTs to words and in magnitude of facilitation effects support the claim that the data collected in this study are veridical with respect to priming processes in the hemispheres. It is suggested that current models of hemispheric language processes require further refinement.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Academic Press Inc.
Copyright: © 2002 Published by Elsevier Science (USA).
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16772
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