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Cat predation and suburban lizards: A 22 year study at a suburban Australian property

Bamford, M. and Calver, M.C. (2012) Cat predation and suburban lizards: A 22 year study at a suburban Australian property. The Open Conservation Biology Journal, 6 (1). pp. 25-29.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874839201206010025
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Abstract

From observations conducted in a suburban property in Perth, Western Australia, over 22 years, it appears that a single pet cat may have exterminated a population (est. 40-50 animals) of the lizard Ctenotus fallens over two years, but with the greatest impact in just the first few months. C. fallens did not begin to recolonise the site until six years after the cat had moved away. The observations support the hypothesis that extinctions of wildlife in suburbia following the introduction of cats can be swift. They also suggest that C. fallens is a suitable species for reintroduction experiments into suburban Perth, comparing the success of reintroductions at sites where cats are confined with those where cats roam freely.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Bentham Open
Copyright: © 2013 The Authors.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16451
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